Tan Hill

The highest inn in England, Tan Hill stands in superb isolation on the Pennine Way, a welcome respite for weary walkers. Its origins date back to the early 13th century. On the old drovers route, animals would have been driven this way to and from Scotland.

Tan Hill Inn was the watering hole for coal miners working the mines in the area and there used to be miners' cottages adjacent tto the Inn which have long since been demolished. A bleak outlook over surrounding moor, the Inn is a reminder of how harsh conditions must have been for workers many years ago, where a pub in the middle of nowhere (which still gets snowed in during desperate winters!) was the light at the end of a long, weary walk...

Featured in an advert for Everest windows some years ago, it has also appeared in Vodafone ads recently. The Everest ads featured a feather dropping unhindered to the floor in front of a door at Tan Hill; feel free to try your own feather!

In 2010 the heavy snows meant the New Year guests had to hole up for three days before the ploughs could fight through the seven-foot drifts to rescue them.  Fortunately, they were in the ideal place to be stranded - plenty of food and drink available in the pub!

 

Services available in Tan Hill:

Swaledale

Courtesy of Leni Hatcher and the National Trust's Outdoor Nation Project